WordPress vs Ghost – which is faster?

Please note this performance/load test is for my educational purposes only, and was not conducted under a professional or fair setting.

First off, my WordPress runs off HTTPS, and Ghost runs off HTTP – apparently there can be about 30% difference in the initial loading as the certificate details need to be resolved.

Other than that, my WordPress is not a vanilla installation of WordPress – although I’ve tried to do some nginx optimisation on it, even till this day, I do not know if it actually had any effect. Oh, and it has a bunch of plugins installed as well – I know I should have installed SSL on my Ghost (I was half way though it) and I know I should have installed a clean version of WordPress, but hey, I don’t get paid for this so I wasn’t going to spend much time on it. Oh, I did set up 2 identical posts at least.

Here it is anyway. I am currently running on a Sydney based AWS EC2 m4.large, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. (I need to save on my bill a bit)

Testing Ghost with 50 users a second gave me pretty damn impressive results with 347ms average response time:

Ghost - 50 clients a second for 1 minute

Ghost – 50 clients a second for 1 minute

 

Ghost also performed reasonably well with 200 clients a second. Although the average response time was about 4 seconds, I would have expected that anyway:

Ghost - 200 clients per second for 1 minute

Ghost – 200 clients per second for 1 minute

 

WordPress on the other hand, was very slow. I’m not sure if this is the fail of my copy-paste nginx optimisation (pretty minimal though) but the average response time was 14 seconds (!) at 50 clients over a 1 minute period:

WordPress - 50 clients per second for 1 minute

WordPress – 50 clients per second for 1 minute

 

…and the loader.io test simply refused to run, despite my best attempt at trying to adjust the error threshold, on the 200 clients per second setting. There probably was no real reason to know the number here anyway, unless for the lulz.

WordPress - 200 clients per second for 1 minute (failed)

WordPress – 200 clients per second for 1 minute (failed)

 

So based on my very poor load/performance/speed testing methodology (there wasn’t one), I can conclude that Ghost outperforms WordPress by at least 40 times.

 

Maybe I’ll migrate this blog over to Ghost, but there aren’t all the cool plugins available for it, so I’ll be staying with WordPress at least for a while 🙂 If anything, I might put Varnish on it later.

Comments

  • Discussion Book

    July 24, 2016 at 11:10 pm

    I am using WordPress from past 4 years and recently trying to make duplicate site at ghost, of one of my existing WP-site as that WP site contains 1250posts and moving those posts to ghost is nightmare, conversion plugin fails if no of posts in a catagory exceeds 200 then can’t export as I believe every thing is beta at this stage.
    Overall Ghost looks good and bit faster than WP but creating and publishing articles are still much user friendly as WP no needs codes to input.
    Themes in Ghost are light weight but still not all themes work well as Ghost API is still in beta state and need support.
    Ghost support team is quick to respond through email but can’t solve migration issues quickly as they work on background before they response or surrender there limits. In other hand still WordPress got all answers on there product upto date.

    Ghost is still new in market and need to make lot of developments that help existing bloggers, for new bloggers it should work well.
    I believe from my experience Ghost needs to work more on there switching mode and stabilise platform, that’s where they can get more bloggers and build there customers.

  • VNCoupon

    July 27, 2018 at 9:07 pm

    But ghost is only suitable for simple websites.

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